Brough Family Organization
www.broughfamily.org

Monte J. Brough (1939-2011)

Contributor to Computerized Genealogy and Family History
and a Member and Supporter of the Brough Family Organization

     Monte James Brough (1939-2011) was a major contributor to computerized genealogy and family history and one of the most visible members and supporters of the Brough Family Organization. He was the great-grandson of Mormon pioneers, Samuel Brough and Elizabeth Bott.
     As a General Authority of the LDS Church, Monte J. Brough served as Assistant Director of the Family History Department from 1989 to 1992 (1) (2), and then as Executive Director of the Family History Department (and President of the Genealogical Society of Utah) from 1993 to 1998. (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) During this time, Monte conceived of an Internet genealogy service which he proposed to LDS Church leaders. (9) His ideas eventually developed into what today is known as FamilySearch.org (10) (11) --which was first released to the online public in 1999. (12) Because of his interest in family history, Monte served as a genealogical consultant to the Brough Family Organization (BFO) (13) from 1990 to 1998 (14), and participated in Brough Family Reunions (15) whenever possible--including serving as the keynote speaker at the International Brough Reunion in Kaysville, Utah, on August 6, 2005.
     In appreciation of his significant contributions and service to computerized genealogy and family history and because of his support of the Brough Family Organization, biographical information about Monte J. Brough is listed below.

History of Monte J. Brough, Deseret News, September 23, 2011:
     
Elder Monte James Brough, a Utah businessman and emeritus general authority for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, died Tuesday, Sept. 20, in Kaysville. He was 72 years old.
     Elder Brough was called to the First Quorum of the Seventy at the October 1988 general conference. When the Second Quorum of the Seventy was established the following April, he was sustained as a member of that quorum. In the April 1991 conference, Elder Brough was again sustained to the First Quorum of the Seventy.
     He also served in the Presidency of the Seventy from August 1993 through August 1998. He was named emeritus general authority on Oct. 6, 2007.
     In his general authority service, he was a counselor in the Utah Central Area, a counselor, then president of the Asia Area, president of the North America Southeast Area and a counselor in the North America Central, Utah North, then the Utah South areas.
    He was born on June 11, 1939, in Randolph, Rich County, to Richard Muir Brough and Gwendolyn Kearl Brough. His father died early in 1941 and his mother, scrambling to find a job in an area still recovering from the Depression, won an election for Rich County treasurer in order to support her family. She held that office for 22 years.
     He overcame some birth defects aggravated by a childhood injury to make his high school basketball team as a junior and was on the starting five as a senior.
     In 1959, he accepted a mission call to the British Isles, where he also was a special counselor in the mission presidency.
     "My mission was the fulcrum event in my life," Elder Brough told the Church News after his call as a general authority. "At the end of my mission experience, I knew that, with God's help, there is nothing on this earth I cannot do, I believe that (philosophy) works in business, I believe that it works in raising children, and, certainly, it works in the church."
     After returning from his mission, he secured employment in the computer department of an aerospace contractor. On Aug. 30, 1962, he married Lanette Barker in the Idaho Falls Temple. They had three sons and four daughters.
     He graduated from the University of Utah in 1965 with a degree in mathematics and later earned a Ph.D. from the U. in business administration.
     Elder Brough also was an IBM systems engineer and founded a multinational computer services company from which he retired prior to being called as president of the Minnesota Minneapolis Mission.
     He also directed business operations in computer services, wholesale distribution, real estate, ranching and investments. He was a director for companies in Canada and the United States. At the time of his call to be a general authority, he was teaching a business strategy course at Brigham Young University.
     Elder Brough was the founding president of the United Way of Davis County and served on the Farmington City Council. He also served in various Scouting and community organizations where has lived.
     In the church he served as bishop, [...]regional representative, member of the Young Men general board, second counselor in the Young Men general presidency and assistant executive director of the Family History Department. He spoke five times in general conference. In his last address, given at the priesthood session of the October 2003 conference, he told young priesthood holders to rise to the challenge of their quorum responsibilities.
     He is survived by his wife and seven children, 23 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
     Funeral services will be held Monday, Sept. 26, at 11 a.m. at the Kaysville Utah West Stake Center, 270 W. Burton Lane, Kaysville. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions to the LDS Church's General Missionary Fund.

Eulogy of Monte J. Brough, Deseret News, September 30, 2011:
     
Born in the rural town of Randolph, Utah, with a childhood and youth spent riding horses and playing in the school marching band, Elder Monte J. Brough would grow to found a highly successful computer services company and ultimately become a General Authority of the Church, what President Thomas S. Monson called "a man for all seasons."
     President Monson made that characterization Sept. 26 in his address at the funeral of Elder Brough, who died Sept. 20. An emeritus General Authority since 2007 and a former member of the Presidency of the Seventy, Elder Brough was 72.
     Speaking at the service in the Kaysville Utah West Stake Center, President Monson shared a letter he had written to Elder Brough's wife, Sister Lanette Brough, and their family, on behalf of the First Presidency.
     "Elder Brough's life was a model of diligence and hard work," the letter read. "His example of devotion as husband, father, grandfather and stalwart servant of the Lord influenced the lives of loved ones and all with whom he came in contact. We are confident that your family members will take comfort in the quality of his life and the memories you share of his abiding love for his family, his humor, his lifelong efforts to accomplish his dreams, his testimony of the gospel."
     The letter made reference to Elder Brough's service to the Church as a missionary, bishop, regional representative, member of the Young Men General Board, president of the Minnesota Minneapolis Mission "and the numerous assignments he willingly fulfilled as a member of the First and Second Quorums of the Seventy."
     An emeritus General Authority, Elder Brough had been a member of the Presidency of the Seventy.In remarks prior to reading the letter, President Monson said of Elder Brough, "You could put him with anyone, and that partner would become a better partner. You could put him anywhere in the world and that part of the world would be ready for harvest, because he knew how to build the kingdom of God in mortality. He's not only one in a million, he's one in your heart, and I thank God for him."
     During his service as General Authority, Elder Brough was president of the Asia Area and North America Southeast Area of the Church.
     A eulogy was given by Val Hanney, a half-brother to Elder Brough (Monte's father, Richard Muir Brough, died shortly after the births of Monte and his younger brother, Max, and their mother remarried). He recounted that while Elder Brough was executive director of the Family History Department, one of his assignments as a General Authority, he conceived of an Internet genealogy service. The Internet was new then, and Elder Brough had to explain it in terms the Brethren could understand. The idea Elder Brough had was developed into what today is FamilySearch.org, which has blessed millions of people.
     Eldest grandchild Whitney Brough Smith read a letter from her younger brother, Mallin, currently serving a mission in Uganada, written to Elder Brough two months before his death. The letter alluded to the affliction that beset Elder Brough in his latter years. "I remember the many times you expressed to me that you wish I could have seen the man you once were," it read. "I want you to know, Grandpa, that I have seen, maybe not in the way you would want. The man you are and were is apparent all around this world. I have now had two General Authorities shake my hand while on this mission, look into my eyes and say, 'It is a pleasure to meet the grandson of Elder Brough.' "
     Each of the seven Brough children, now grown with families of their own, gave a brief tribute to their father.
     Youngest daughter Kami Kilgore said she was recently feeling discouraged about her pregnancy. Her father told her, "Oh, Kami, I wish there were an easier way to get them here," then said tearfully, "This is the greatest thing you could do. The work your mother has done is far greater than anything I've ever accomplished."
     Eldest son Joe, who presides over the Guatemala Guatemala City Mission, wrote this in a letter read at the funeral: "Dad, you always found time for each member of your family, especially the children. While doing this, you were still able to place the Lord first."
     One of the speakers was Max Brough, Elder Brough's younger brother by 13 months, who currently presides over the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. As boys close in age, he said, they shared a bedroom growing up. Some people know their hometown of Randolph, he said, only because it is frequently on the weather reports as the coldest spot in Utah.
     "But I learned early to say my prayers before I went to bed," he said, "because he would come home, wake me up, and ask, 'Did you say your prayers?' If I hadn't, he'd get me out of bed in the cold, and we'd kneel down and say our prayers together."
     The two developed the nickname "Brow" or "Browser" for each other, derived from the way professors at the University of Utah would mispronounce their last name, which is correctly pronounced "Bruff." President Brough said that in recent weeks he would call his brother every three or four days. Elder Brough's affliction got to the state that he was unable to make his speech understood on the telephone. At one point, Monte told Max, "Don't hang up, Brow. Even if we don't talk to each other, the fact that I know you're on the other end of this line makes me feel better."

Obituary of Monte J. Brough, Deseret News, September 22-23, 2011:
     Monte J. Brough, beloved husband, brother, father, grandfather and great-grandfather, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, September 20, 2011. Monte was born June 11, 1939 in Randolph, Utah to Richard Muir and Gwendolyn Kearl Brough. Monte married his eternal companion, Lanette Barker, on August 30, 1962 in the Idaho Falls Temple.
     Monte's life was one of willing, faithful, and dedicated service. His genuine kindness and his entertaining sense of humor endeared him to all who knew him. His family was his pride and joy, and he found great happiness spending time with and supporting them. He loved hunting with his sons and traveling with his daughters.
     Monte served as a missionary in the British Isles from 1959 to 1961. Upon his return, he earned a degree in mathematics and later a Masters Degree and Ph.D. in Business Administration from the University of Utah. He worked with computers and in management and eventually founded his own computer services company. He was the founding president of the United Way of Davis County.
     Monte served in many Church leadership positions. From 1978 to 1981, he presided over the Minnesota Minneapolis Mission and had great love and gratitude for each of his missionaries. Monte was called to serve as a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy in 1988. He served in the Presidency of that quorum from 1993-1998. He was the executive director of the Family History Department. During part of his time as general authority, he served as president of the Asia Area and North America Southeast Area. He was named General Authority Emeritus October 2007. He willingly dedicated his life to sharing the gospel and testifying of the Savior, Jesus Christ.
      Monte is survived by his wife of 49 years, Lanette; seven children: Joseph (Emily) Brough, Dalene (Sid) Magill, Lanelle (Troy) Butterfield, Chris (Jessica) Brough, Mona (Chris) Andrus, Brian (Tora) Brough, Kami (Ty) Kilgore, 23 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, siblings: Kae Weston, Dick (Lola) Brough, Max (Rosanna) Brough, and Val (Virginia) Hanney. He is preceded in death by his parents, step-father, Lawrence Hanney, and brother-in-law, Ivan Weston.
     Funeral services will be held Monday, September 26, 2011 at 11 a.m. at the Kaysville Utah West Stake Center, 270 W. Burton Lane, Kaysville, Utah. Friends may visit family on Sunday from 6 to 8 p.m. at Lindquist's Layton Mortuary, 1867 No. Fairfield Road and Monday from 9 to 10:15 a.m. at the church. Interment, Kaysville City Cemetery.
     In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions be made to the General Missionary Fund of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Information about Monte J. Brough from Wikipedia, December 10, 2012:
     Monte James Brough (June 11, 1939 - September 20, 2011) was a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1988 until his death. He was a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy in 1988 and 1989 and from 1991 to 2007 and was a member of the Second Quorum of the Seventy from 1989 to 1991. Brough was a member of the seven-man Presidency of the Seventy from 1993 to 1998.
     Brough was born in Randolph, Utah. His father died when he was still a baby, and his mother was barely able to support her family of four children. He served as an LDS Church missionary in the British Isles from 1959-1961. He married Lanette Barker; they would eventually have seven children.
     Brough earned a degree in mathematics from the University of Utah. He worked with computers and in management and eventually founded his own company services company. From 1978 to 1981 Brough was the president of the Minnesota Minneapolis Mission of the LDS Church.
     From 1982 to 1983, Brough was a member of the general board of the LDS Church's Young Men organization. Brough served as the bishop of the church's Kaysville Ward from 1983 to 1987. From 1985 to 1986 he also served as executive secretary of the Utah North ARea Presidency. He served as a regional representative from 1987 to 1988. He was a resident of Kaysville at the time of his call as a general authority.
     During part of his time as a general authority, Brough served as president of the Asia Area of the LDS Church. In this capacity, Brough was closely involved with the opening of church missionary work in Mongolia. He also served as a couselor in the general presidency of the Young Men organization. After his time as a member of the Presidency of the Seventy, Brough served as president of the North America Southeast Area.
     As a general authority, Brough also served as Assistant Director of the Family History Department from 1989 to 1992 and then as Executive Director of the Family History Department (and President of the Genealogical Society of Utah) from 1993 to 1998. During this time he conceived of an Internet genealogy service which he proposed to church leaders. His ideas eventually developed into what today is known as FamilySearch.org--which was first released to the online public in 1999. In addition, Brough was one of the most visible members and supporters of the Brough Family Organization.
     In October 2007, Brough was designated an emeritus general authority of the LDS Church.
Brough died on September 20, 2011, aged 72, in Kaysville, Utah.

Selected LDS Church Articles and Speaches by Monte J. Brough
"A Willing Heart", General Conference address, October 1988
"Elder Monte J. Brough of the First Quorum of the Seventy", Ensign magazine, November 1988
"The Chocolate Bar", New Era magazine, October 1990
"The Modern Mighty of Israel", General Conference address, October 1993
"Guidance for Unwed Parents", Ensign magazine, September 1994
"Everyone's Blessing", Ensign magazine, December 1994
"Search for Identity", General Conference address, April 1995
"Mighty Men and Women", New Era magazine, May 1995
"Who Am I", New Era, July 1996
"A Holy Calling", General Conference address, April 1997
"Living the Law of Sacrifice", Ensign magazine, April 2000
"Young Men - Holders of Keys", General Conference address, October 2003
"Friend to Friend: The Dawning of a Testimony", Friend magazine, September 2005
"I Know What I Know", New Era magazine, October 2006
"Lessons from the Old Testament: Adversity, the Great Teacher", Ensign magazine, August 2006
"How the Hong Kong Temple Came to Be", Ensign magazine, December 2006

RBFO International Headquarters: 115 East 800 North, Bountiful, Utah, 84010, USA.
Email: officer@broughfamily.org