Brough Family Organization
www.broughfamily.org

Allred Family Organization

Genealogical Database of the Allred's of Eccles, Lancashire, England, From the 1500's to 1700

     The Allred Family Organization is a large ancestral family organization that has genealogical ties to the Brough Family Organization.
     There are a number of relationships between members of the Allred and Brough families. Here are just four of them: 1) In 1878, James Anderson Allred (1819-1904) of Bedford Co., Tennessee, married Elizabeth Ann Brough (1861-1944) of Spring City, Utah, in Salt Lake City, Utah; 2) In 1904, Cyrus Edward Allred (1881-1969) of Spring City, Utah, married Grace Brough (1879-1968) of Spring City, Utah, in Manti, Utah; 3) In 1905, Edna Allred (1882-1943) of Spring City, Utah, married Raymond Gilbert Brough (1881-1971) of Spring City, Utah, in Manti, Utah; and 4) In 1944, Arlin Richard Allred Jr. (1921-1978) of Logan Utah, married Ethel Brough (1926-1976) of Green River, Wyoming, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Most of the descendants of these couples now live in the western United States.
     Limited information about the Allred family of England and the United States is posted on the Brough Family Organization website as a courtesy to members of both family organizations. For further information about the Allred family please visit the official Allred Family Organization website.

Allred Ancestry

     Hundreds of years ago the Allred family settled in Eccles, Lancashire, England. These early family members were the progenitors of thousands of Allred descendants who now reside in Western Europe, North America and elsewhere around the world. The histories of these early Allred families have been described in a number of publications.

     In 2015, an extensive book was published about the Allred family of England and the United States, and was entitled: From England to America: Our Allred Family, by Dawnell Hatton Griffin, Watkins Printing, Logan, Utah, 2015, 348 pages. This book is available at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. Below are some interesting comments from this publication:
     For many years...it was widely believed...that we descend from Henry Aldridge and that the surname [of Allred] was changed by John Aldridge (married to Anne Hamilton) from Aldrige/Aldrege to 'Allred.' We now know that this is not the case. We descend from John Allred (Orred) of Pendleton Pool, Eccles Parish, Lancashire, England and his wife, Ellen Pemberton. Their son, Soloman Allred immigrated to Pennsylvania sometime in the late 1600's or early 1700's. In addition to documents that have been discovered in the past few years, DNA tests have confirmed that we have roots in Lancashire, England and that the Allred and Aldridge family do not originate from a common source. (Pages V-VI)
     Early church records of the Eccles Parish in Lancashire, England provide us with glimpses into the lives of our ancestors who were mostly landless tenant farmers and weavers. (Page VII)
     
According to the above 2015 book, the Allred lineage extends from England to Utah as follows:

          Solomon Allred (1680-after 1754), christened in Eccles, Lancashire, England;
               married Ann York; left England and arrived in Pennsylvania in about 1718.
          Thomas Allred (1724-1810), born in Pennsylvania;
                married Elizabeth Twigg (1732-1769).
          William Allred (1750-1827), born in North Carolina;
               married Elizabeth Thrasher (1754-1842).
          James Allred (1784-1876), born in North Carolina;
               married Elizabeth Warren (1786-1879);
               this couple crossed the Plains of the United States and settled in Spring City, Utah;
               this couple and six of their children died in Utah.
               A book about James and Elizabeth Allred was published in 1995 and enlarged in 2009.

     In early 2016 the Research Committee of the Brough Family Organization (BFO) received a request from related Brough and Allred family members to research, document and publish all Allred-surnamed individuals listed in the parish records of Eccles, Lancashire, England, who were christened, married and/or buried in Eccles from 1564 to 1700.
     This BFO research project eventually resulted in the production of a publication entitled The Allred's of Eccles, Lancashire, England, From the 1500's to 1700. Today the genealogical information contained within this publication is available as a seperate database. This publication lists the ancestors of Solomon Alred (Allred) as follows:
          
John Alrede (b.abt.1500), listed in a 1526 tax record; of Eccles, Lancashire, England.
          William Alred (b.abt.1525), married his second wife in 1567 in Eccles, Lancashire, England.
          Johanes Alred (b.abt.1548-d.1594) , buried in 1594 in Eccles, Lancashire, England;
          John Alred (the Elder, 1571-1633), christened and buried in Eccles, Lancashire, England;
               married Anne Taylor.
          William Alred (1594-1661), christened and buried in Eccles, Lancashire, England;
               married Alicia Tonge.
          John Alred (1637-1701), christened and buried in Eccles, Lancashire, England;
               married Ellin Pemberton.
          Solomon Alred (Allred, 1680-after 1754), christened in Eccles, Lancashire, England;
               married Ann York; left England and arrived in Pennsylvania in about 1718.

Allred Coat of Arms

Use and Meaning of a Coat of Arms

     The following information comes from the World Book Encyclopedia and was quoted in the 1981 RBFO book The Ancestors of Richard Brough and Mary Horleston, pp.43-44:
     A "Coat of Arms" is a heraldic design, used to distinguish individual families and to authenticate official documents. The Coat of Arms comes from the custom of embroidering the emblem of a knight on the surcoat which he wore over his armor.
     Heraldic symbols as we know them today developed with the use of armor in the Middle Ages. The suit of armor made it difficult to distinguish friend from foe during violent hand-to-hand combat, and knights developed heraldic symbols so they could identify each other. The symbols usually commemorated an event in the knight's life, or some outstanding quality.
     During the Middle Ages, heraldic symbols were also used in everyday life. Most persons did not know how to write, so they had to develop some way of proving the authenticity of various documents. It became common practice to use a seal with a person's heraldic design as a signature. The introduction of gunpowder into warfare made armor obsolete. As a result, heraldic symbols were no longer needed as a means of recognition on the battlefield. These symbols became more useful as an emblem distinguishing a particular family than as a mark of an individual knight. [Similarly, the College of Arms has stated: "With the introduction of gunpowder and artillery the use of arms on the jousting field and in battle eventually decreased, while the use of arms in civilian activities and social endeavors increased."]
     In England, Richard III established the Herald's College (College of Arms) in 1484 AD. The Herald's College decided(s) who is entitled to wear coats of arms. Also, in such [areas] as Great Britain, heraldic symbols usually depict the ancestry of a particular individual, rather than an element of his life.
     A complete coat of arms consists of a shield, crest, and motto. The shield, or escutcheon, is the basic element. A helmet, or supporters, or both may be added. Accessories include the wreath, mantling and scroll. The wreath represents a device used to cover the point where the crest was attached to the knight's helmet. The mantling originally protected the knight from the direct rays of the sun and also protected the helmet from stains and rust.

College of Arms in London, England

     January 2016, the College of Arms website stated the following:
     Heraldry: "There is no such thing as a 'coat of arms for a surname'. Many people of the same surname will often be entitled to completely different coats of arms, and many of that surname will be entitled to no coat of arms. Coats of arms belong to individuals. For any person to have a right to a coat of arms they must either have had it granted to them or be descended in the legitimate male line from a person to whom arms were granted or confirmed in the past."
     Coats of Arms: "Coats of arms belong to specific individuals and families and there is no such thing as a coat of arms for a family name. From their origins in the twelfth century to the present day arms have been borne by individuals, and by corporate bodies, as marks of identification. They have also been used to denote other characteristics, which have changed over the centuries as society and culture have evolved. New coats of arms have since the fifteenth century been granted both to individuals and corporate bodies by the senior heralds in Royal service, the Kings of Arms."
     Granting of Arms: "As of 1 January 2016 the fees payable [to the College of Arms] upon a personal grant of arms and crest are £5,750 [about $8,117], a similar grant to an impersonal but non-profit making body, £12,100 [about $17,080], and to a commercial company, £17,950 [about $25,338]."

Heraldic Designs of Allred Coat of Arms

     An Allred Coat of Arms has been used by members of the Allred family for hundreds of years. Family members have used and displayed different heraldic designs of the Allred arms due to family traditions and varying descriptions of the arms in heraldic publications. For example, two well-known and respected heraldic publications described the Allred (Alred, Aldred or Alured) arms and crest as follows:
     General Armory Two, edited and augmented by Cecil R. Humphery-Smith, 1974. This book contains Alfred Morant's additions and corrections to the 1842 book General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, And Wales, by Sir Bernard Burke, Ulster King of Arms, London, England. First Edition: 1842. General Armory Two, on page two, gives the following description of the Aldred arms: "Aldred. Gu. a chev. engr. betw. 3 griffin's heads erased or. Cady." This statement translates as: "A shield of red (Gu.) containing a chevron design (chev.) with a line of partition (engr.) between 3 yellow or gold (or.) griffin's heads that appear jagged and severed (erased) from their bodies." The word "Cady" refers to "A manuscript [entitled] 'Alphabet of Arms' apparently compiled by William Cady, a clerk in the Herald Office, c.1630. The chief part of the work seems temp Henry VIII & the additions made by Cady. The volume also contains copies of Grants of Arms & it is in the possession of A.W.M." Also, General Armory Two, on page three, gives the following description of the Alured arms: "Alured (Hull, co. York). Gu. a chev. engr. betw. 3 griffins' heads erased arg." This statement translates as: "A shield of red (Gu.) containing a chevron design (chev.) with a line of partition (engr.) between 3 white or silver (arg.) griffin's heads that appear jagged and severed (erased) from their bodies."
     Fairbairn's Book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, by James Fairbairn, and later revised by Lawrence Butters), London, England. First Edition: 1859; Used Edition: Reprint of the Fourth Edition Revised and Enlarged [containing] Two Volumes in One, Vol. 1, 1968. Fairbairn's book, on page eight, gives the following description of the Aldred crest: "Aldred, an arm in armour embowed, holding a cross crosslet fitched in pale. [This crest is pictured in the book as number] 198.5." Also, Fairbairn's book, on page eleven, gives the following description of the Alred crest: "Alred, Holderness, Yorks, a griffin's head ppr." [This crest is pictured in the book as number] 66.1."

     In 1992, the Allred Family Organization published an article about the Allred Coat of Arms of Yorkshire, England.

New Allred Coat of Arms, 2016

     In early 2016, related Brough and Allred family members asked the Brough Family Organization (BFO) to produce a new Allred Coat of Arms. In May 2016, the BFO commissioned Julie Rebecca Thorup, a graphic-artist living in Utah, to create a professional looking Allred Coat of Arms.
     Using well-known Allred-related documents and heraldic symbols, Julie Thorup incorporated historic Allred family art and designs into her drawing, which resulted in an Allred Coat of Arms that was true to its heraldic past while presenting a new and vibrant display of Allred family heritage and tradition.
     The BFO has now made Julie Thorup’s 2016 artistic drawing of the Allred Coat of Arms freely available to all Allred family members who wish to use it.

The above Allred Coat of Arms can be viewed and freely printed from the following links:

Allred Coat of Arms with large surname text, PDF file, 2016
Allred Coat of Arms with surname on scroll, PDF file, 2016

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